REPOST: First Impressions: What Good Design Can Do for Your Business

While the monetary value of logos, packaging graphics, and similar ‘intangible assets’ are difficult—if not impossible—to measure,  it is in meaningful visuals that brands are actually able to build trust in their customers. Here’s an article on Business News Daily that explains how good design could be just as important as your company’s overall business plan.

 

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A brand’s website can make a difference between showing potential customers you’re a legitimate business and having zero credibility. That’s why web design is important as a marketing tool. It highlights the need to invest time and resources into a well-built homepage, so it doesn’t appear you’ve settled for a default theme or overly-simple layout.

Business News Daily consulted a few experts in the field to investigate what makes or breaks a small business website.

Why design matters

According to the Missouri University of Science and Technology, a person’s eyes take 2.6 seconds to focus on a specific element of a web page when it loads. The viewer quickly forms an opinion based on what they’ve has seen, so it pays to influence that opinion with a smart design, said Adriana Marin, a freelance art director.

“People have [feelings] about your company based on the experiences that they have had with a brand,” Marin told Business News Daily. “A well-designed logo and website inspires confidence because it looks professional. If a company is willing to focus on creating a clean and functional design that is easy to use, then that could be an indicator of what using their product might be like.”

“Great design not only conceptually reflects the mission of your company, but also, functionally, it’s the embodiment of that concept,” added Ty Walrod, CEO of Bright Funds, an all-in-one corporate program for donating, matching and volunteering.

As an example, Marin cited Apple’s unique designs, which distinctly distinguish itself from its competitors. In the 1980s and ’90s, design was often an afterthought for many major technology companies, she said. Apple worked with several partner companies to create the consistent design aesthetic consumers recognize today.

Continue reading HERE.